News Release Library
September 8, 2011

Faculty Members Publish Papers

Our distinguished faculty members are scholar-practitioners with years of industry experience and research acclaim. Nearly 90% of our professors hold PhDs or the highest degree in their discipline. They stay active in their fields and are passionate about bringing their expertise to the classroom. St. Edward’s University faculty members garner recognition near and far. Their latest paper accomplishments from the 2010-2011 academic year include:

Kelley Coblentz Bautch, associate professor of Religious Studies presented the paper “Of Sheep and Sheaves: The Rhetoric of Agriculture” at the Southwest Commission on Religious Studies in a section hosted by the American School of Oriental Research and Society of Biblical Literature in the Southwest Region on March 5 in Irving, Texas.

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Shannan Butler and Corinne Weisgerber, assistant professors of Communication presented the peer-reviewed paper “Empowering Students through Personal Learning Networks Built on Social Media” at SXSWedu in Austin in March 2011.

 

 

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Associate Professor of Marketing Michaelle Cameron presented “How to Get the Most from Guest Speakers” at the National Conference of Sales Management on March 31, 2011, in Orlando, Fla. The topic of her presentation was pedagogical in nature.

 

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Associate Professor of Management Helene Caudill will present the paper “Factors Affecting Grading Errors in Adult Higher Education: A Framework” at the American Society of Business and Behavioral Sciences 14th International Conference in Paris, France, on June 24–26, 2011.

Caudill and Anthony Perez ’11 presented two papers:

  • “Advertising Using Gay and Lesbian Imagery: The Impact on Brand Image” at the American Society of Business and Behavioral Sciences 18th Annual Meeting in Las Vegas in February 2011.
  • “Alienating the Mainstream: Does the Inclusion of Gay and Lesbian Imagery Diminish Brand Perception?” at the 33rd INFORMS Marketing Science Conference, hosted by Rice University in Houston on June 9–11, 2011.

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Mark J. Cherry, the Dr. Patricia A. Hayes Professor in Applied Ethics and professor of Philosophy, engaged in the following lectures and conference presentations during the 2010–2011 academic year:

Invited Lectures:

  • “Christian Bioethics Questions in a Post-Christian Age,” presented in Chicago on July 2, 2010. 
  • “Professional Guinea Pigs: Paid Medical Human Research Subjects,” presented at the Annual Medical Ethics Conference on March 19, 2011.
  • “Private Goods, Public Goods, and Unjust Discrimination: Against Public Smoking Bans,” presented at the College of New Jersey on April 15, 2011.
  • “The Socio-biological Foundations of the Family,” presented at the University of Alba Iulia in Romania on May 7, 2011.

Conference Presentations:

  • “Towards the Simplicity of Moral Truth: Bringing the Secular World to Christ,” presented at the “Younger than Sin: Retrieving Simplicity through the Virtues of Humility, Wonder & Joy” conference at University of Notre Dame in Indiana on Nov. 20, 2010.
  • “Sex, Abortion and Infanticide: The Cleft between the Secular and the Divine,” presented at SOPHIA in Kendelia, Texas, on February 12, 2011.

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Matt Clements, assistant professor of Economics presented the paper “Inefficient Incentives for Risk Bearing” at the International Academy of Business and Economics Conference in Las Vegas in October 2010. One generally accepted cause of the Financial Crisis of 2008 is that some risks, such as the risks associated with certain collateralized debt obligations, were not priced correctly. Two potential reasons for this are that the risks were not well understood, and that those choosing to bear risk had too much incentive to do so. At least part of the reason why a consumer would take large risks but not small ones is that laws and other institutions create the incentive to do so. A potentially more interesting question is why these incentives exist in the first place. This paper considers the extent to which risk is handled inefficiently in the U.S. and argues that this is a systemic phenomenon. The paper examines the historical roots of institutions governing risk and argues that a fundamental misunderstanding of the nature and extent of risk faced by the typical consumer has played a key role in the development of these institutions.

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Associate Professor of Accounting Carolyn Conn and two of her students, Isabel Serrano ’12 and Peggy Wiggins ’12, gave a presentation at the American Accounting Association Southwest regional meeting in Houston on March 12. “Experiential Learning...with a Twist” described the research project from Dr. Conn’s undergraduate Accounting Ethics course and the resulting video produced in conjunction with the Texas State Board of Public Accountancy (TSBPA) and the National Association of State Boards of Accountancy. Donna Hiller, TSBPA Director of Qualifications, also participated in the presentation.

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Assistant professor of Psychology Mike Disch and psychology student Ashlee Andres ’12 presented research on human decision making at the 2011 annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in San Antonio. The research was designed to examine the effects of having participants engage in mathematical thinking prior to answering questions about the probability that a described individual was a member of one of two categorical groups. Typically in such cases, humans ignore base rate, or frequency information, in favor of judgments based on the similarity between the described individual and the categories to which they could belong. We found that priming participants with math questions led to an increase in their likelihood of using rational decision making processes, rather than the typical judgments based on similarity.

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Assistant Professor of Education Steven Fletcher presented the following papers:

  • “Unplugging the Math and Science Teacher Pipeline: Recruitment from Community Colleges,” at the Austin Science Education at the Crossroads Conference in Austin, in April 2011.
  • “Unpacking mentorship: Voices from science teachers that mentor preservice teacher candidates,” (co-authored) at the National Science Teacher Association Annual Meeting in San Francisco, in March 2011.

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Associate Professor of Communication Teresita Garza was invited to chair a panel entitled “Race and the Production of Identity via the Technologies of Culture” on Nov. 15, 2010, at the 2010 National Communication Association Convention in San Francisco. The panel was sponsored by the Critical and Cultural Studies Division of the National Communication Association.

Garza was selected to present at the 96th annual 2010 National Communication Association Convention on Nov. 16, 2010, in San Francisco. The competitively selected panel on which she presented was entitled “Somos de Una Voz? (Are we of one voice?): Building Bridges Between Critical Cultural Studies and Latin@ Communication Studies.” The panel was sponsored by the Critical and Cultural Studies Division of the National Communication Association.

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Hollis Hammonds, area coordinator and assistant professor of Art, had the paper “For Better or For Worse: The Union Between Teaching & Making Drawings” accepted for a panel presentation at the biennial conference of Foundations in Art Theory and Education (FATE) in St. Louis, in March 2011. FATE is a national association dedicated to the promotion of excellence in the development and teaching of college-level foundation courses in both studio and art history. The paper explores the role of the educator/artist in higher education and the reciprocal relationship between teaching art and the studio practice.

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Arcelia Hernandez, Education instructor, presented “Teacher Candidate/Intern Professional Development through an Induction Learning Community” at a conference in New Orleans, on Feb. 18, 2011.

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Brother George Klawitter, professor of English presented his paper “Andrew Marvell’s ‘Little T.C.’: Ekphrastic Poem and Political Commentary” at the South-Central Renaissance Conference at St. Louis University in early March. The paper will be published in the fall in the journal Explorations in Renaissance Culture.

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Judy A. Leavell, associate professor of Reading was invited to present her paper “Allusions to Culture and Religion in Hispanic American Children’s Literature” at the Oxford Roundtable at Oxford University in the United Kingdom on March 14, 2011.

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University Programs faculty Susan Loughran presented the paper “The Millennial in Your Classroom” at the 17th National Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Faculty Development Symposium “Closing the Generational Divide: Strategies that Work for Teaching and Assessing Millennial Students at HBCUs,” held on Oct. 21–23, 2010, in New Orleans.

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Catherine Smith MacDermott, professor of Business Communication, presented “The Road Less Traveled … Study Abroad Programs for the Millennial Generation” at the W.H.A.T. Conference on Feb. 19, 2011. Many study abroad programs were developed before the “Millennial Generation” began studying abroad. How students make study abroad decisions and how to ensure success and essential global learning meant adapting a model to the traits of this generation. An analysis by faculty who led a recent study abroad program addressed how they adapted program to the demands and needs of the millennial student and their helicopter parents. This workshop described a recently developed model, lessons learned, and shared the adaptations being made to address the “Seven Distinguishing Traits of the Millennial Generation.”

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Professor of Management Lewis A. Myers, Jr. presented the paper “Globalization: Economics versus Ethics” at the Ninth Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities on Jan. 9–12, 2011, in Honolulu, Hawaii. The paper is an investigation and discussion of the upside and the downside of globalization from both Economic and Ethical perspectives. Economic upsides can appear to be very minimal when compared with the Ethical downsides of globalization.

Myers also presented the paper “A Capstone Course for the Information Systems Major” at the 40th Annual Meeting of the Western Decision Sciences Institute on April 5–8, 2011, in Portland. The paper describes a proposed pedagogy that uses a web based business simulation to expose the information systems student to system development life cycle assignments based on dynamic real world business scenarios. The pedagogy can be applied in both individual and group system development assignments. This is proposed to be the Capstone course for graduate Computer Information Systems students.

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Joseph O’Neal, New College faculty, presented the paper “Alternative Farming Movements in the U.S.: Visions of Sustainability” at the annual meeting of the Society for Applied Anthropology in April. The paper was included in a session on Cultural Perspective on Alternative Agricultural Systems.

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Psychology students Emily Barton ’11 and Zorica Simic ’11, and assistant professor Delia Paskos, presented “Exploring the Effects of Impulsivity and Video Game Playing on Executive Function Tasks” at the 57th annual meeting of the Southwestern Psychological Association in San Antonio, on March 2–5, 2011, and at the Symposium on Undergraduate Research and Creative Expression (SOURCE) at St. Edward’s University on April 15, 2011.

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Assistant Professor of Human Services in the School of Management and Business Constance Porter co-authored with student Shannon Kroll MA ’11 the study case “Supervisory dilemmas for a newly promoted Community Healthcare Clinic Office Manager.” The case was included in a textbook published by Pearson Publishing in Fall 2010.

Human Service professionals are committed to behaving in a manner that is compliant with the National Organization for Human Services’ (NOHS) Ethical Statements. Effective leadership also requires a strong commitment to ethical decision making with complex situations that require an appropriate level of action. Determining how to appropriately respond to ethical problems and when to take action can be especially challenging for new supervisors. If situations are not handled appropriately the resulting affects can have a negative impact on employee conduct and organizational effectiveness. The case prepares the reader to respond to a variety of dilemmas that human service professionals might encounter in a clinic setting. It assists the reader in understanding their approach to conflict and provides suggestions for developing appropriate responses to situations that require ethical intervention.

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Catherine Rainwater, professor of English, will present the paper “Ojibwan Personhood and Resistance to Globalization in Louise Erdrich’s The Plague of Doves” at Indiana University in Bloomington at the 2011 conference of the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment on June 21–26, 2011.

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Assistant Professor of Sociology Michelle Robertson presented the paper “Academic Irony: Teaching about Institutionalized Inequality” at the 2011 Pacific Sociological Association’s annual conference on March 10–13, 2011, in Seattle. She also presided over a Pedagogy panel at the same conference.

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Grant W. Simpson, dean and professor of Education, presented “Virtual Assessment of Pre-Service Teacher Dispositions” at the Consortium of State Organizations for Texas Teacher Education Annual Conference in Houston on Oct. 10–12, 2010.

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Danney Ursery, professor of Philosophy, presented the paper “The Hidden Minority: Disability, Leadership, and the Workplace” at the Southwest Society for Disability Studies conference in Albuquerque last October. He also co-presented the paper “Global Fairness: CSR Engagement and the Faces of Poverty” at the Association for Practical and Professor Ethics conference in Cincinnati in March. The presentation was with Drs. Jennifer Greene, assistant professor of Philosophy in New College, and Pauline Albert, assistant professor of Management.

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Jennifer Elisa Veninga, instructor of Religious and Theological Studies, delivered the paper “Imagining Theology in a Secular Age: Social Imagination as Methodology” at the 2010 American Academy of Religion (AAR) conference in Atlanta, Georgia, on October 30–November 1, 2010. The paper was presented to the Religion and Social Sciences section of the AAR and elaborated on the methodology employed in her doctoral dissertation, an analysis of the Danish cartoon controversy of 2005–2006.

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Michael Wiedorn, assistant professor of French, was accepted to give papers at the “Caribbean Globalizations” conference at Oxford University, UK, in September 2010 and the annual meeting of Société des Professeurs Français et Francophones d’Amérique (SPFFA) at Fordham University in New York in October 2010.

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Assistant Professor in University Programs Amy Nathan Wright presented “Using Racial Humor in the Classroom” at the annual meeting of the Association for General and Liberal Studies in Austin on Oct. 8, 2010.    

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This is the third of five blog entries that will highlight faculty accomplishments compiled for the May Board of Trustees meeting. The series will containfaculty members who have published books and book chapters, journal articles and poetry, papers, art and photography exhibits, awards and recognitions.