The Computer Science department at St. Edward’s University educates students in the theory and development of computer software

As Computer Science major, you’ll study the algorithmic processes that create, describe, and transform information. 

The Computer Science Department offers three degree options for students interested in studying Computer Science: 
  • BA in Computer Science
  • BS in Computer Science
  • BA in Computer Information Science

Our department reflects the beliefs of St. Edward's University by offering a flexible degree plan. Rigorous field-specific coursework coupled with the freedom to explore general elective courses ensures students graduate with a comprehensive education. As a result, more than 75% of computer science students at St. Edward’s find work within six months of graduation. Students within these majors have made such substantial achievements as algorithmic trading on Wall Street to DNA mapping with the Human Genome Project.

Close interaction with faculty at St. Edward’s — and time spent in classes, labs, advising sessions and program events — sets the groundwork for undergraduate students to continue on to graduate studies or pursue careers in the software industry.

Advanced Computing Lab

The Computer Science department provides practical experience in an educational and supportive setting. The Advanced Computing Lab (ACL) offers state-of-the-art computing services that allow students in Computer Science and related fields to engage in hands-on learning.

ACL features include:
  • Access to the Ubuntu/Linux operating system
  • Access to Mac, Windows, and other platforms
  • Individual and group study spaces 
  • Lab assistants available for on-site help

The ACL is located in John Brooks Williams South room 166. The lab is open 24 hours a day, 7 days per week for Computer Science students. Students and faculty with an authorized access St. Edward's ID card may enter the ACL at any time. 

Student Organizations

We encourage students to explore interests by engaging in learning opportunities outside of the classroom. 

  • The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) is the world’s largest educational and scientific computing society. ACM serves to advance the field of computing with leading-edge publications, conferences, and career resources.
  • The IEEE Computer Society serves a global community of researchers, educators, professionals, and students by providing information, networking, and career development services. 
  • The Consortium for Computing Sciences in Colleges (CCSC) promotes the advancement and use of computer-oriented curricula in educational institutions. CCSC hosts meetings in conjunction with local, regional, and national organizations to improve the use of computing as an educational resource. 
  • The Loosely Organized Computer Organization (LOCO) promotes the understanding of computers and computer science through inviting industry speakers, promoting group study, and providing mentors to new students. For more information, contact loco [at] stedwards.edu.