Color is a key component of St. Edward’s University brand identity. Our color palette not only represents our heritage but also expresses our personality, distinguishes our brand and helps us create consistent experiences for our audiences.

Consistent use and careful matching are essential to establishing and maintaining a unified brand image. The following outlines color guidelines for print products. Refer to Digital Standards for color guidance online. 

Heritage Palette

Our heritage palette has a deep-rooted history with the university. These colors are primarily used when awareness with the university is high and communication is focused internally. For example, these colors are used in our logo, for presidential materials, awards, simple internal communications and Athletics.

If possible, the heritage colors should be used as Pantone values. When appropriate, gold can be printed as a metallic (usually reserved for stationery, business cards, diplomas and other formal applications).

NAME
St. Edward's Blue

PMS
281 C

CMYK
100-64-0-60

RGB
0-37-102

HEX
​#002566

St Eds gold

NAME
St. Edward's Gold

PMS
4505 C

CMYK
20-25-60-25

RGB
159-145-103

HEX
#9f9167

St Eds metallic gold

NAME
St. Edward's Metallic Gold

PMS
8640 C

 

Primary Palette

Our brand voice is bold, authentic, purposeful and inspirational — our primary palette uses bright colors to bring these attributes to life. The colors in this palette have a collaborative relationship with one another and were chosen to play off each other. Our primary colors are sophisticated, fun and reflect St. Edward's unique ties to Austin. St. Edward's students are unique, diverse, vibrant and comfortable in their own skin. These colors mirror those characteristics in bold and purposeful ways.

The primary palette is used for establishing a strong brand presence and marketing to current, prospective and current students (and parents), alumni and graduate students.

NAME
Deep Eddy

PMS
2945 C

CMYK
100-64-0-24

RGB
0-77-142

HEX​
#004d8e

NAME
Mount Bonnell

PMS
630 C

CMYK
56-4-15-0

RGB
106-213-234

HEX​
#6ad5ea

Hike and bike

NAME
Hike and Bike

PMS
Pantone Yellow C

CMYK
0-15-100-0

RGB
254-224-75

HEX​
#fee04b

 

Continental

NAME
Continental

PMS
473 C

CMYK
0-27-35-0

RGB
252-195-162

HEX​
#fcc3a2

Red Doors

NAME
Red Doors

PMS
179 C

CMYK
0-84-80-0

RGB
238-82-69

HEX​
#ee5245

Peacock

NAME
Peacock

PMS
346 C

CMYK
63-0-59-0

RGB
92-191-142

HEX​
#5cbf8e

 

Moontower

NAME
Moontower

CMYK (rich black)*
76-67-67-88

RGB
0-0-0

HEX​
#000000

*Moontower, a rich black, should only be used for graphics and large text (18 points or greater). Small body text should always be set in 100% black. Learn more about rich vs. 100% black and how to configure your settings in Adobe applications to ensure accurate printing.

 

Color Usage

It is important to note that all tints and shades of the above colors are available for use, however, for most marketing purposes, Deep Eddy, Mount Bonnell and Hike and Bike should dominate while Continental, Peacock and Red Doors should be used more sparingly. 

Consider the intended audience and usage of your communication to help determine which colors work best. The traits listed on the following color spectrum grid serve as a guiding framework.

Color chart

To avoid your materials taking on a rainbow look and ensure readability, it is important to use a restrained color palette. Color particularly should be restrained when vibrant and colorful photography is used. In these instances, limiting to 2-3 colors and using color as small pops of design to play off colors in a photograph are recommended practices. 

Color layouts
Left: Hike and Bike is used as a colorful border to accent the photograph while Mount Bonnell and Continental are used to call attention to an infographic. Middle: Type doesn't compete with five colorful photos and is kept to a minimum of three colors and used sparingly (only as headlines and subheads). Right: Continental is used to pop off the lush green background of the photo. With a vibrant image, additional colors, Deep Eddy and Red Doors, are kept at a minimum.

Color combinations should be vibrant and play off one another. For large areas of background color, use Deep Eddy, Mount Bonnell and Peacock. Red Doors, Hike and Bike and Continental should be used more sparingly as background colors. These work well as pops of color on top of darker backgrounds.


Left: Landmark is set in Hike and Bike to pop off the colorful photo background. Middle: Colors are kept to a minimum and ample white space is used to not compete with the three colorful photos. Right: Landmark is set in two colors that correlate with the headlines and contrast nicely with the background color.

 

Slide 1
This PowerPoint slide pairs a photo with a dark background color (St. Edward's Blue) and a bright headline (Peacock).

Slide 2
This slide uses Hike and Bike as the background color, Deep Eddy for text and Red Doors for highlighting stats.

 

Slide 3
Red Doors is used as a sidebar in this slide with a headline set in St. Edward's Blue. Continental and Hike and Bike highlight the infographic on top of the photo. 

Slide 4
Red Doors and Deep Eddy play off the colors in the photo. The type is easily legible on the empty space of the photo.

 

Legibility and Fonts

As a general rule, large chunks of body text should be set in black. Numbers and graphic elements should vary in color to provide balance and hierarchy. CTAs, urls and important information should be set in bright colors when possible to call attention to their importance.

Color combos

Color combos

Landmark should primarily be used in Deep Eddy, Hike and Bike or white. Other colors from the palette can be used as long as legibility is still achieved. Keep readability in mind when using a photo as a background element. Multi-color display type should be used as mainly a design element and sparingly. After reviewing these guidelines, download or request Landmark files from the Resources section.

Landmark colors

Above all, use of color should never hinder legibility. Being mindful of print production and screen accesibility to ensure maximum legibility should always be the number one priority.

Color combo crimes

DON'T: 

  • Place colors together that do not have enough contrast with one another.
  • Add different colored strokes to colored text.
  • Add excessive drop shadow to type.
  • Place colored type on a busy photo background.

Now that you've reviewed the color guidelines, visit Resources to download our color palettes.