2018-2019 Cohort

We're proud to welcome our new cohort of McNair Scholars. They were inducted November 30, 2018.

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Isabella Barnes
Hometown: Washington, DC
Major: Behavioral Neuroscience
Graduation: Spring 2020

Cole Calderon
Cole Calderon
Hometown: Fairview, Texas
Major: Biology
Graduation: Spring 2020

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Rachelle Cardoza
Hometown: Weslaco, Texas
Major: Kinesiology
Graduation: Spring 2021

Shawntia Dunna
Shawntia Dunna
Hometown: Peachtree Corners, GA
Major: Behavioral Neuroscience
Graduation: Spring 2020

Isabel Garcia
Isabel Garcia
Hometown: McAllen, Texas
Major: Psychology
Graduation: Spring 2021

Bianca Garcia-Gonzalez
Bianca Garcia-Gonzalez
Hometown: McAllen, Texas
Major: Behavioral Neuroscience
Graduation: Spring 2021

Carolina Hernandez
Carolina Hernandez
Hometown: Brownsville, Texas
Major: Global Studies
Graduation: Spring 2020

Victoria Jaimes
Victoria Jaimes
Hometown: Austin, Texas
Major: Psychology
Graduation: Spring 2021

Ryder Nicholas
Ryder Nicholas
Hometown: Austin, Texas
Major: Behavioral Neuroscience
Graduation: Fall 2019

Miriam Osheyack
Miriam Osheyack
Hometown: South Stafford, Vermont
Major: Psychology
Graduation: Spring 2020

Leslie Rios
Leslie Rios
Hometown: Hidalgo, Texas
Major: Political Science
Graduation: Spring 2020

Rebecca Sanchez
Rebecca Sanchez
Hometown: Austin, Texas
Major: Sociology
Graduation: Spring 2021

David Weier
David Weier
Hometown: Plano, Texas
Major: Biology
Graduation: Fall 2019

 

2017-2018 Cohort

The 2018 Cohort was inducted into the McNair Scholars Program in December 2017. Their work was presented July 2018 McNair Research Symposium following eight weeks of a research internship.

Guadalupe
Guadalupe Aguilar
Hometown: Brownsville, Texas
Major: Forensic Chemistry
Graduation: Spring 2019

Assessment of Titanium Dioxide as a Development Method for Latent Fingerprints on Dark Adhesive Surfaces
Research directed by Dr. Casie Parish Fisher, School of Natural Sciences

Fluorescent chemicals have been used to aluminate latent fingerprints on dark surfaces; however, the dyes bind to cyanoacrylate fuming, which is used as a pretreatment on nonporous surfaces. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has been found to produce good contrast on dark surfaces during latent fingerprint processing by staining the fingerprint white without fuming. This project aims to combine basic yellow 40 and TiO2, to produce a white residue with possible fluorescence.  Different concentrations of TiO2 and basic yellow 40 were utilized to process black adhesives to determine if fingerprints could be viewed in ambient light and an alternate light source (ALS).

Andrea
Andrea Calderon
Hometown: Spring, Texas
Major: Environmental Science and Policy
Graduation: Spring 2019

Does awareness to the risks associated with unethical product sourcing influence consumer purchase behavior?
Research directed by Dr. Peter Beck, School of Behavioral and Social Sciences

Consumers are interested in an organization’s commitment to corporate social responsibility, and have an affinity for industries that abstain from the conventions of production that lend to existential abuses of human rights and environmental degradation. And while consumer ideologies towards corporate social responsibility are well recorded, the impact of the awareness factor remains an enigma. The purpose of this study is to bridge this gap and examine whether awareness to the risks associated with unethical standards of production influences consumer purchase behavior. If there is a direct correlation, then industries have an obligation to release full disclosure of the PLC.

Kaylee
Kaylee Delgado
Hometown: Brownsville, Texas
Major: Biology
Graduation: Spring 2020

Fighting Drug Resistance: Plant Extracts as Potential Sources of Antimicrobial Agents
Research directed by Dr. Trish Baynham, School of Natural Sciences

The World Health Organization projects that antibiotic resistant infections will impact more than 500,000 people worldwide and would cost the United States more than 2 billion dollars annually. In this study, over one thousand plant extracts obtained from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) were tested for antimicrobial activity using the Kirby Bauer Disk Diffusion method and 13 showed inhibition from 8 to 30 mm against Staphylococcus aureus. Their minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) ranged from 0.0078 to 2 mg/mL. These plant extracts may be further studied and developed to be used as an alternative or supplemental treatment for antibiotic resistant infections.

Alessandra
Alessandra Urbina
Hometown: Houston, Texas
Major: Global Studies
Graduation: Spring 2020

Evaluating the Ethicality of Federal Legislation Permitting Government Surveillance Practices in the United States
Research directed by Dr. Jooyoun Lee, School of Behavioral and Social Sciences

Ethical dilemmas in data science have recently become more prominent due to individuals’ growing concerns about data privacy. While there are a number of federal protections in the United States for citizens regarding individual rights to privacy in industries such as business or medicine, there are few that refer specifically to governmental use of private data. This research critically analyzes federal legislation established to protect citizens from potentially exploitative government use of private data by applying key data ethics principles to the legislation examined, allowing for conclusions to be made concerning the ethicality behind government usage of private data.